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Welcome to Carteret County Democratic Party site. We are your neighbors and have the same concerns as you do: a quality education for our young people, affordable healthcare for everyone, jobs with a living wage, and keeping our coast healthy, beautiful, and free from drilling. We work to ensure that all our voices are heard locally as well as at the state and national level. As Democrats, we are traditionally the ‘big tent’ party that welcomes everyone regardless of who you are. All North Carolinians should have a fair shot at a good life, regardless of their background, where they came from, how much money they have, or who they love. This is something we believe in and need to continually reaffirm in practice. You can download our Strategic Plan here.

Calling all Volunteers Volunteer Wannabes! 

You are invited to The Volunteers Brunch (yum) 

Saturday, June 1, 10 am to 12 pm,

401 Sailview Ct, Beaufort

(Eastman Creek Clubhouse, Beaufort off of 101)

Please let us know you are coming. 

 

 Click Here to Add Your Name 

 

THE COST OF DOING NOTHING ISN’T NOTHING

Barack Obama’s eulogy of the Honorable Elijah Cummings

“To the bishop, and the first lady, and the New Psalmist family, to the Cummings family, Maya, Mr. President, Madam Secretary, Madam Speaker, governor, friends, colleagues, staff.

The seed on good soil, the parable of the sower tells us, stands for those with a noble and good heart, who hear the word, retain it, and by persevering produce a crop. The seed on good soil.

Elijah Cummings came from good soil. And in this sturdy frame, goodness took root. His parents were sharecroppers from the South. They picked tobacco and strawberries, and then sought something better in this city, South Baltimore. Robert worked shifts at a plant, and Ruth cleaned other people’s homes. They became parents of seven, preachers to a small flock. I remember I had the pleasure of meeting Elijah’s mother, Ruth, and she told me she prayed for me every day, and I knew it was true, and I felt better for it. Sometimes people say they are praying for you, and you don’t know. They might be praying about you, but you don’t know if they are praying for you. But I knew Miss Ruth was telling the truth.

So they were the proverbial salt of the earth, and they passed on that strength and that grit, but also that kindness and that faith to their son. As a boy, Elijah’s dad made him shine his shoes and tie his tie, and they’d go to the airport—not to board the airplanes, but to watch others do it. I remember Elijah telling me this story. Robert would say, “I have not flied. I may not fly, but you will fly one day. We can’t afford it right now, but you will fly.”

His grandmother—as Elijah related—and as grandmothers do, was a little more impatient with her advice. Your daddy, she said, “he’s been waiting and waiting for a better day. Don’t you wait.” And Elijah did not wait. Against all odds, Elijah earned his degrees. He learned about the rights that all people in this country are supposed to possess, with a little help, apparently, from Perry Mason. Elijah became a lawyer to make sure that others had rights, and his people had their God-given rights, and from the statehouse to the House of Representatives, his commitment to justice and the rights of others would never, ever waver.

Elijah’s example: a son of parents who rose from nothing to carve out just a little something, a public servant who toiled to guarantee the least of us have the same opportunities that he had earned. A leader who once said he would die for his people, even as he lived every minute for them—his life validates the things we tell ourselves about what’s possible in this country. Not guaranteed, but possible. The possibility that our destinies are not preordained. But rather, through our works, and our dedication, and our willingness to open our hearts to God’s message of love for all people, we can live a purposeful life. That we can reap a bountiful harvest. That we are neither sentenced to wither among the rocks nor assured a bounty, but we have a capacity, the chance, as individuals and as a nation, to root ourselves in good soil.

Elijah understood that. That’s why he fought for justice. That’s why he embraced his beloved community of Baltimore. That’s why he went on to fight for the rights and opportunities of forgotten people all across America, not just in his district. He was never complacent, for he knew that without clarity of purpose and a steadfast faith, and the dogged determination demanded by our liberty, the promise of this nation can wither. Complacency, he knew, was not only corrosive for our collective lives, but for our individual lives.

It has been remarked that Elijah was a kind man. I tell my daughters—and I have to say, listening to Elijah’s daughters speak, that got me choked up. I am sure those of you who have sons feel the same way, but there is something about daughters and their fathers. And I was thinking, I would want my daughters to know how much I love them, but I would also want them to know that being a strong man includes being kind. That there is nothing weak about kindness and compassion. There is nothing weak about looking out for others. There is nothing weak about being honorable. You are not a sucker to have integrity and to treat others with respect. I was sitting here and I was just noticing the honorable elijah e. cummings and, you know, this is a title that we confer on all kinds of people who get elected to public office. We’re supposed to introduce them as honorable.

But Elijah Cummings was honorable before he was elected to office. There’s a difference. There is a difference if you are honorable and treated others honorably outside the limelight. On the side of a road; in a quiet moment, counseling somebody you work with; letting your daughters know you love them. As president, I knew I could always count on Elijah being honorable and doing the right thing. And people have talked about his voice. There is something about his voice. It just made you feel better. There’s some people, they have that deep baritone, a prophetic voice. And when it was good times and we achieved victories together, that voice and that laugh was a gift. But you needed it more during the tough times, when the path ahead looked crooked, when obstacles abounded. When I entertained doubts, or I saw those who were in the fight start to waver, that’s when Elijah’s voice mattered most.

More than once during my presidency, when the economy still looked like it might plunge into depression, when the health-care bill was pronounced dead in Congress, I would watch Elijah rally his colleagues. “The cost of doing nothing isn’t nothing,” he would say, and folks would remember why they entered into public service. “Our children are the living messengers we send to a future we will never see,” he would say, and he would remind all of us that our time is too short not to fight for what’s good and what is true and what is best in America.

Two hundred years to 300 years from now, he would say, people will look back at this moment and they will ask the question “What did you do?” And hearing him, we would be reminded that it falls upon each of us to give voice to the voiceless, and comfort to the sick, and opportunity to those not born to it, and to preserve and nurture our democracy.

Elijah Cummings was a man of noble and good heart. His parents and his faith planted the seeds of hope, and love, and compassion, and righteousness in that good soil of his. He has harvested all the crops that he could, for the Lord has now called Elijah home, to give his humble, faithful servant rest. And it now falls on us to continue his work, so that other young boys and girls from Baltimore, across Maryland, across the United States, and around the world might too have a chance to grow and to flourish. That’s how we will honor him. That’s how we will remember him. That’s what he would hope for. May God bless the memory of the very honorable Elijah Cummings. And may God bless this city, and this state, and this nation that he loved. God bless you.”

This is Us

IT’S WAS A FABULOUS PARTY!

MUSIC BY KUDUBAI – GREAT FOOD – GREAT PEOPLE- GREAT VENUE AT BACKSTREET PUB

TheWinner
BUCK BAYLIFF WON $5000 AND THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY ADDED $13,400 TO ITS COFFERS FOR 2020

Another Dem Book Club

Our Next Books will be:

January 7th         Dark M​oney: The Hidden History of the Billionaire Behind the rise of the Radical Right. Jane Mayer. Doubleday, 2016. 464 pp. Non-fiction book written by the American investigative journalist Jane Mayer, about a network of extremely wealthy conservative Republicans, foremost among them Charles and David Koch, who have together funded an array of organizations that work in tandem to influence academic institutions, think tanks, the courts, statehouses, Congress, and the American presidency for their own benefit. Mayer particularly discusses the Koch family and their political activities, along with Richard Mellon Scaife and John M. Olin and the DeVos and Coors families.

February 4th       For African History Month, please read one or both of the following titles.

Sundown Towns: A Hidden Dimension of American Racism. James W. Loewen . New Press, 2005. 436 pp. According to bestselling sociologist Loewen (Lies My Teacher Told Me), “something significant has been left out of the broad history of race in America as it is usually taught,” namely the establishment between 1890 and 1968 of thousands of “sundown towns” that systematically excluded African-Americans from living within their borders. Located mostly outside the traditional South, these towns employed legal formalities, race riots, policemen, bricks, fires and guns to produce homogeneously Caucasian communities—and some of them continue such unsavory practices to this day. Loewen’s eye-opening history traces the sundown town’s development and delineates the extent to which state governments and the federal government, “openly favor[ed] white supremacy” from the 1930s through the 1960s, “helped to create and maintain all-white communities” through their lending and insuring policies. Note: is available as an audio-book.

                           Between the world and Me, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Spiegel and Grau, 2015. 176 pp. It is written as a letter to the author’s teenage son about the feelings, symbolism, and realities associated with being Black in the United States. Coates recapitulates American history and explains to his son the “racist violence that has been woven into American culture.” Coates draws from an abridged, autobiographical account of his youth in Baltimore, detailing the ways in which institutions like the school, the police, and even “the streets” discipline, endanger, and threaten to disembody Black men and women. The work takes structural and thematic inspiration from James Baldwin‘s 1963 epistolary book The Fire Next Time. Unlike Baldwin, Coates sees white supremacy as an indestructible force, one that Black Americans will never evade or erase, but will always struggle against.

March 3rd             SAVING CAPITALISM For the Many, Not the Few. Robert B. Reich. Alfred A. Knopf, 2015. 279 pp. To understand “Saving Capitalism,” Robert Reich’s sweeping treatise on inequality in America, you must accept a central premise: The free market is fundamentally a human construct and so to debate the appropriateness of government in shaping it is beside the point. Someone is always writing the rules of the market. Reich’s concern is that over the last three decades, the lead authors have been Wall Street, big corporations and the wealthy elite. His fear is that “we are lurching toward a capitalism so top-heavy it cannot be sustained.” Note: you may also watch the documentary of the same title on Netflix!!     

The books may be purchased used on Amazon for a pittance or at The Book Shop ($10 membership takes 25% off new books for a year)

       What the Dems are Reading ...

  1. Dark Money: The Hidden History of the Billionaires Behind the Rise of the Radical Right by Jane Mayer
  2. The New Breed, Second Edition: Understanding the 21st Century Volunteer by Jonathan McKee
  3. The all new Don’t Think of an Elephant: Know Your Values and Frame the Debate by George Lakoff
  4. The Little Blue Book: The Essential Guide to Thinking and Talking Like a Democrat by George Lakoff
  5. Squeezed: Why Our Families Can’t Afford America by Alissa Quart
  6. Your Brain’s Politics: How the Science of Mind Explains the Political Divide by George Lakoff
  7. Volunteer Engagement 2.0 Ideas and insights changing the world edited by Robert J. Rosenthal

Join us as a volunteer (on your own terms). We are a fun group. Click here to let us know your interests so we can get to know you better (even if you are already a volunteer it will help us ensure you are doing what you want to do).  Also, check out our new standing committees. Standing committees are self directed and report to the Executive Board. It is a chance to be creative and exercise your talents.

So you want to volunteer?

HEADQUARTERS NEEDS STAFF 

Email: CCDP Headquarters

Staff: M-F  10 am –   2 pm, 1 to 4 pm, Sat 12 to 4 pm – great place to hang out and Do Some Good! Stop by and sign up – September has lots of slots. Check out the open slots here:

HQ Staffing Calendar

Meet at the HQ ...

The HQ is your place. HQ is open for scheduling meetings. Groups can meet in the front room and the middle room during regular hours or off hours. With a little planning, it is feasible to have two meetings at the same time. There is a projector, projection screen and wifi. You can patch in people via video conference if your whole group cannot assemble in person.

To schedule your meeting at HQ, Email: CCDP Headquarters

Check out the HQ Meetings Calendar for dates and times available (lots of them currently): HQ Meetings Calendar

 

NC Policy Watch news changes daily so check out on a regular basis. Watch the dates to see the release date of the information. It is a great source for keeping tabs on the GA and the shenanigans of NC politics.  NCDP Takeaways summarize the week’s news and are disseminated on Fridays . Message Guidance and NCDP Takeaways typically change weekly. Other  guidance and ‘immediate releases’ come from NCDP as events occur. 

Mark Your Calendars!

march calendar
Meetings
Tuesday, November 125:30 – 6:30pm
Monthly on the second Tuesday
 
Frangzang@yahoo.com
Description:CCDW Board meeting
Voter Outreach and Communications Committee
Wednesday, November 132:00 – 3:30pm
Location: HQ

CCDP Breakfast meeting at the Golden Corral. 

4060 Arendell St, Morehead City

Speaker Nida Allam, NCDP 3rd Vice Chair

Officers meet at the HQ monthly. Open to Democrats.

Carteret County Democratic Women Meeting

When: Tue, November 26, 2019, 5:30pm – 8:00pm
Where: Sanitary Restaurant, Morehead City
Description; Each month there is a special guest speaker. Dutch treat social at 5:30pm, meeting begins at 6pm.

Democratic Women LTE Meets

When: First Thursday of every month, 5pm – 6pm
Where: Carteret County Democratic Headquarters, 700 Arendell St, Suite 1, Morehead City
Description: This is a monthly meeting of individuals who want to express Democratic opinions in the local and state newspapers.
Events

Stop in and celebrate the season with your fellow Democrats. Open to everyone.

Carteret County Democratic Party Bulletin Board  

Click Here to See Pictures from Past Events

Civil Rights

1020 Active Hate Groups in the United States - Click on map to go the the Southern Poverty Law Center's interactive map to see hate groups in your state and around the nation

Environment Call To Action

Climate Change

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